Prolific?


First … I’m getting a little miffed over the continued absence of my Web site. I should have been able to upload my files to the server yesterday, but I couldn’t. And still can’t. The Go Daddy folks say they’ve elevated my help request to high priority. Hopefully something will get done today and I can get the site back up.

Now then, in talking with my agent he said again that having the Web site and blog are important because editors will snoop on an author there to see if the author is prolific. Personally, I think my blog time could be better spent on a book, but I see his point. If you’re a snooping editor, howdy! Lantz said the editor will want to know it didn’t take the author 10 years to get one book done. (Okay, if you’ve read the afterword of Shara you know it did take 10 years on that one, but hey, I went to college, got a degree, and wrote another book during that time. Gimme a break.)

Here’s a list of stuff I have that could be sold:

Amara’s Prayer — Obviously, this is the one Lantz is pitching for me.

Shara — I’d love to see it go to an established publisher that would give it a push; 3F is dead and the book never got what it deserved, considering the favorable reviews from the people who have read it.

The Prometheus Syndrome — My first novel, finished in about 1989. I’m rewriting it now and making it a period piece, still set in the 1980s, during the heyday of heavy metal hair bands. It has a mad scientist, ghosts, a zombie and rock-n-roll. A fun novel, like a B movie, that explores anger management and the different types of hauntings.

The Living Dark — This was my second novel. Not the most original premise (ancient evil invades small town) but I like it. I started revising it a few years ago but put it aside when 3F accepted Shara. A preacher summons an “elder god” to a small western Oklahoma town and has to be stopped by his daughter, her boyfriend and the town undertaker.

The Puppet King — This is the first of a sword and sorcery fantasy series about Tarod, the Nine-Fingered. I was writing it to be like the Ace editions of the Conan books, where each tale is a novella that fits into a period of the character’s life. The book came up short for modern word counts, but I’ve read over it and found many places where I could add depth and reach the word count. Tarod isn’t very likable in most of this first book, but he begins to change toward the end and events from this part of his life keep coming back on him throughout the series.

We the People — My “political awakening” novel. Probably unsalable, though there are some ideas I’m sure I’ll salvage from it for other projects. Plot: Environmentalists take over the planet. Colorado was nuked and the land is now being used for a minimum security prison. A rebellious lad is sent there, makes friends, finds a space shuttle and proof that a country called the United States had colonized another planet prior to the Greenie takeover of Earth. He and his friends blast off to find the colony. Was meant to be the first in a trilogy.

Bold Bounty — Historical romance set in the Viking era. It’s about 15,000 words too short, but I have notes on how to make the bad guy a werewolf (he’s already French) and add some depth to the relationship between the leading lady and her mother. The synopsis and first three chapters took third place in the Oklahoma Writers Federation, Inc. contest about four years ago. No small feat considering the huge number of romance writers in OWFI.

The Fetch — Maybe the best of my pre-Shara concepts. It’s about astral projection and the world a teenage boy finds locked away in his mind. I wrote the first draft and never revised it because I immediately began working on another project.

Darkscapes — My short story collection, first published by a disreputable Baltimore-based company, but I got the rights back to it earlier this year. That “publisher” had it for a little less than two years; their edition had 34 stories in it. I’d like to republish it with six more stories. Very few copies sold (surprise!) from that company.

Songbird — A chapter book for young readers, probably age 5-7, told in the Disney fairy tale tradition about a young woman held in a tower by trolls and the seafarer who sets out to rescue her.

Shim and Shay’s Wish — A rhyming children’s story about two kids who go looking for fairy gold to give to their parents, but find out what their parents really value. As with Songbird, I just don’t know enough about the market for this stuff. I wrote them for my kids.

Other projects I’ve begun:

Ulrik — The sequel to “Shara.” Starts faster, with the conflict of the book presented immediately. Also involves characters from Murdered by Human Wolves. I have about 50 pages done and am itching to finish work on The Prometheus Syndrome so I can get back to this one.

Heart of the Wolf — Another historical romance, but this one is about a woman in Colonial America who falls in love with a very young Ulrik. Part of my Werewolf Saga that would be published under a different name. A synopsis and first three chapters took third place in the OWFI contest three years ago.


0 responses to “Prolific?”

  1. hey a breakthrough!! yesterday it was just ‘page not found’ but today you have this:
    If you are the owner of this web site you have not uploaded (or incorrectly uploaded) your web site. For information on uploading your web site using FTP client software or web design software, click here for FTP Upload Information.

  2. hey a breakthrough!! yesterday it was just ‘page not found’ but today you have this:
    If you are the owner of this web site you have not uploaded (or incorrectly uploaded) your web site. For information on uploading your web site using FTP client software or web design software, click here for FTP Upload Information.

    • Your agent?
      Doesn’t your agent realize that most people do NOT like to read online in the first place? Blast the Blog and do your writing instead.
      Lots of luck.

      • Re: Your agent?
        Well, actually, it seems a lot of people do like to read blogs. Read books online? Nah. But read a short entry to see what a friend is up to? Sure. I’ve become addicted to a few blogs, myself. It’s such a hurried world now. Sometimes friends don’t have time to send even a quick e-mail, but you can go to their online journals and see what they’re up to.
        And in a world where most people do not even know their neighbors but have dozens of online friends to whom they tell their most intimate secrets, I’m not so sure that’s a good thing. But there it is.

    • Your agent?
      Doesn’t your agent realize that most people do NOT like to read online in the first place? Blast the Blog and do your writing instead.
      Lots of luck.

      • Re: Your agent?
        Well, actually, it seems a lot of people do like to read blogs. Read books online? Nah. But read a short entry to see what a friend is up to? Sure. I’ve become addicted to a few blogs, myself. It’s such a hurried world now. Sometimes friends don’t have time to send even a quick e-mail, but you can go to their online journals and see what they’re up to.
        And in a world where most people do not even know their neighbors but have dozens of online friends to whom they tell their most intimate secrets, I’m not so sure that’s a good thing. But there it is.

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